Conference highlights

The focus of the conference is on the relationship between psychosis, migration status and cultural transition and how to (re)connect. Central to our idea of reconnecting is combining different points of view and ways of understanding and this is a recurring theme over all the four days of the conference.

 

 

Combining different points of view and ways of understanding

On day 1 combining different points of view and ways of understanding is to be applied to the different schools of thought of clinicians and scientists.

In the morning, a Dutch epidemiologist and researcher (Wim Veling), an Indian/Dalit/British clinician and medical anthropologist (Suhrut Jahdav) and a French psychoanalyst (Francoise Davoine) are brought together to present possible reasons for why immigrants and refugees have an up to 12 times higher risk on receiving the diagnosis of Schizophrenia.

This meeting of different theoretical and practical cultures and ways of understanding is continued in the afternoon with individuals and family members with lived experience meeting and confronting clinicians from various theoretical backgrounds, discussing the relationship between psychosis, migration status and cultural transition and possible ways to (re)connect

 

People with lived experience taking the lead

For combining different points of view and ways of understanding on Day 2 the stage is given to individuals and family members with lived experiences of mental health difficulties: what do they have to say on how to (re)connect and how can this apply to immigrants and their families?

In the morning, Brenda Froyen testifies about her estrangement from her family, followed by Marcus Evans who discusses from a nurses point of view how to contact within a psychiatric ward and how to bridge the gap between patient and staff. Ending the morning program of Day 2, Ingo Lambrecht, an experienced clinician as well as a trained shaman, speaks about how a different ways of understanding psychosis can contribute to reconnecting and relationships.

 

A social and political view on psychosis, migration, and flight

Combining different points of view and ways of understanding on Day 3 will apply to society and how we organise it. Tina Rahimy, professor Social work in the superdiverse city, chairs and moderates this day. In the morning program, Wouter Kusters argues that fear for world destruction in psychosis can tell a lot about the fears living in the community. Huub Mous follows with comparing the road to psychosis with the road to a jihad. Finally, Mogobe Ramose criticizes Western culture and presents us an alternative, African way of thinking and behaving, respectfully connecting to group, ancestry and progeny.

In the afternoon of this Day 3, open for general public, Rotterdam students and different immigrant groups will present and partake.

 

Consequences and lessons learned combining with new research

Looking back on the conference panel and audience together will discuss the consequences and lessons learned of the conference days. Also on this last day of the conference Ola Söderstöm will present a way of researching what psychosis prone people experience when walking in a city. Inez Germeys will give us her findings on prospective adolescent research.